The Savvy Scribe

From 0 to six figures in less than a year - with Ashley Hay, RN

June 18, 2019 Episode 11
The Savvy Scribe
From 0 to six figures in less than a year - with Ashley Hay, RN
Chapters
The Savvy Scribe
From 0 to six figures in less than a year - with Ashley Hay, RN
Jun 18, 2019 Episode 11
Janine Kelbach and Carol Bush
Zero to Six Figures with Ashley Hay
Show Notes Transcript

Ashley Hay, RN started her freelance journey to supplement her nursing income. She has achieved that financially...and then some! We can all learn from her journey! Take a listen as she walks us through her path to six figures!

Ashley Mentions the following in this episode:


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Thanks for listening!
Carol & Janine






Speaker 1:
0:00
Welcome to the savvy scribe, a podcast for freelance healthcare and medical writers who want to start or grow their business. Your hosts, Carol Bush and Janine Kalbach. We'll help you build a profitable health writing business without having to spend years figuring it out on your own. Now let's join the conversation.
Speaker 2:
0:20
Hey, savvy scribes, Janine Kalbach popping in here. Just let you know about our new upcoming group coaching event. The Savvy Scribe Growthlab is a strategic coaching program that can take you from part time freelance work to full time in less than one year. Carol and I are ready to support you with our group coaching trainings, coworking sessions and accountability. Just for a minute, think about this. What if you can experience coaching that would help you create a strategic plan to follow, to start your freelance business accountability, to push you through your goals and training tips and tricks into the deep how tos of freelancing and how to do it. It's already well into this year. If you have not had the chance to focus or implement strategies to reach your goals, let us help you by joining the savvy scribed growth lab. Go to our podcast website, show notes for a link to join and make this your best investment yet for your business. Now back to the show. Well, hello savvy scribes. It's Janine here today and today we have an awesome interview for you guys. This is an interview with Ashley. Hey, she's a registered nurse, lives out in California and today I just wanted to share her story about freelance writing as a nurse and how she built her freelance writing business from zero to six figures in one year. So Hi Ashley.
Speaker 3:
1:58
Hi Janine. Thanks for having me. This is exciting.
Speaker 2:
2:00
Absolutely, absolutely. I am so excited to hear your story. I've been so close to your journey and it's awesome. It's awesome to see somebody grow from zero, literally zero two I can't do this to six figures. So first, tell us where you're from and what got you into writing.
Speaker 3:
2:24
It's funny because it really hasn't been that long of a journey, but when you look back now, it really feels like a lifetime almost. So I guess just to give everybody a little bit of my background, I was born and raised in New Jersey. I started my nursing career at Sloan Kettering in New York City in oncology. I always knew that I definitely wanted to go into oncology care. I'm pretty certain that that had to do with seeing my father throughout my years as a right above the knee amputee. He was diagnosed with osteosarcoma about six months after my parents were married. So he had lost his life just before I was born. So I didn't know how many different, but yeah, I just always, um, was really fascinated by the relationship that him and my mother had, um, with his oncology nurse that took care of him throughout most of his time there.
Speaker 3:
3:14
And that was really something I wanted. So, um, I pursued oncology over 12 years. I kind of bounced back and forth between adult and pediatric care in the oncology setting, you name it, inpatient, outpatient, night shift, bone marrow wound care, GI, Proton therapy. You know, I kinda, I kinda did it all and they got a ton of experience. I really loved it. And uh, but just to kind of avoid burnout, you know, I was always really changing kind of my career path of what I was going to do. So to go back to a little bit more of kind of why I fell into this freelance writing, it was really out of necessity at some point than it was actually out of desire. I had always been interested in reading and writing from a young age, but it wasn't anything I thought that would be lucrative or that was realistic to pursue.
Speaker 3:
4:06
I just, I don't know if I was kind of sheltered from that. I hadn't had any experience meeting anyone who had done it. Uh, so I kind of went through my nursing career in high school though I was diagnosed with a primary immune deficiency my junior year and that required constant infusions of Ibg. And funny enough, I was infused on a pediatric oncology floor, so I got to again see, you know, oncology nursing from that perspective. And then, you know, fast forward I'm a nurse working very long shifts and um, I really began to struggle with my own health, taking care of myself and in my twenties my immune deficiency ended up kind of progressing and manifesting itself in autoimmune symptoms. Um, and I really struggled with chronic pain, fatigue and a multitude of other issues. And I ended up getting married and moving to California with my husband.
Speaker 3:
5:01
That was really when things are kind of hit the fan. I had been on disability before in my twenties but I really started to get very ill working such long shifts and it just became difficult and my husband's been an incredible source of support for me and he was really the one that said to me like, you have to figure something else out because you know, you're so smart and you've had such success in your nursing career, but I don't see bedside care as an option for you going forward. And we can talk a little bit about kind of how that all progressed. Um, I feel now like I've been talking for five minutes, but yeah,
Speaker 2:
5:35
you're good. Um, I think first that's really awesome that your husband stepped right in and was like Ashley enough. And I think as the nurse in us, we never give ourselves that room to breathe. So you were probably just working, working, working and like you're supposed to or whatever they tell us and never even exploring that side of your creativity of the writer and you know, you love to read and all that kind of stuff cause you're probably just so exhausted. And I think one of the trends we find with a lot of healthcare providers that go into freelance writing is we do bounce around a lot. And I don't know if it's the curiosity or the why with everything, but I do notice a lot of nurses and physicians and pharmacists bounce to different career paths. Not because we don't like it, but because we're curious. I think. So it was interesting that you mentioned those and a lot of people that have struggled with those chronic diseases and it leads them into having to do something else, but it's still, your brain's not affected. You know what I mean? Like you need to use your brain still. And what an awesome way that you've been able to do that with going into a writing path.
Speaker 3:
6:47
Yeah. And that actually turned out to be such an unexpected benefit of healthcare writing for me was I have like this constant love of learning, which I think many nurses do. I knew writing would be satisfying for me, but what I didn't realize is that I would learn even more about other aspects of healthcare that maybe I didn't have expertise in. For example, like writing a piece on cardiac rehabilitation in having to research a lot for my client. Now I feel pretty well versed in cardiac rehabilitation. And the other thing too, you know, we were talking about how my husband kind of was pushing me to reevaluate and, and at the time I just felt like my identity and my truly my ego with so immeshed in being an oncology nurse, being a bedside oncology nurse, because I became a nurse at 21 years old. So that was all I knew the end. I felt like, you know, if I couldn't be a bedside nurse, what would I be in this world
Speaker 2:
7:49
down all the pains of nursing school and go through all that, get, take that and CLECs exam. It's study your butt off and it's almost stripped away in a sense like wait, if I'm not a nurse in between these four walls of a hospital or a clinic, what am I, what can I do? It is like you said, a loss of identity. Like is this truly what nurses can they even do anything else? And you know, I don't want to speak just for nurses because savvy scribes for all the healthcare providers in the sense of writers. But you know, that's something we both see. And I think a lot of, a lot of nurses see that when any, and probably even physicians and pharmacists that, you know, have an interest in writing. You don't think that you're good enough to do a rite aid because we did nursing. So why are we writers now?
Speaker 3:
8:41
Yeah, I agree. I just think, you know, it was funny because at the time I was almost very defeated for obvious reasons, right. But, um, I thought to myself, yeah, right. And I'm young, you know, so you think like this isn't the, it's supposed to go. Um, but once I kind of, you know, had my own little, I allow myself like a very small pity party and then we got to move on, you know, keep it moving. Um, but I realized, I felt so defeated in the beginning because I really was never taught in nursing school or throughout my nursing career that there was anything else asked the bedside. Yes. Like in nursing school, it was very clear to me that you either worked for a, you know, in a doctor's office or you worked in a hospital and, or you did something like management, which I had,
Speaker 2:
9:29
I called the community. You get right in the community. Right. I see what you're saying.
Speaker 3:
9:35
Right. So that's why I just, I really felt so lost. Like, well I guess I just have to give up nursing altogether. And it was something that I really just had such a passion and love for. And now that's kind of the best part of it, you know, is that I, I still feel like I'm helping people, patients, providers through education, which is like a love of mine. But the other thing that I really came to realize probably more so more recently is, um, that, you know, I think we all think that like seeking self identity is limited to like your coming of age period. You know, adolescents are your early twenties. And what I have found is that it really is something that can be reevaluated throughout periods of your life because, and I'm sure we'll talk about this more, but in finding like my writing community that are nurses, I just, I feel even more so how I felt, you know, when I was like feeling kind of lost in the world in my early twenties. And then I found my nursing community and I was like, these are my people. Yes. And now I find like I speak to my writer friends and you know, who happened to now, most of us are nurses that I've been able to find and I feel like these are my people. Like this is my tribe and this is where I'm supposed to be. So it's just a really, uh, incredible life lesson. I think that like you're never too old to just change it up.
Speaker 2:
10:57
Exactly. You know, it is a common thing I hear if people stumble upon the podcast or the website or our community on Facebook or whatever, it could be my blog or your blog or something like that. Oh my gosh, this is what I've been looking for. Like it's finally find the key that opens the door of like the yes and I know your story so, but I want you to share it. How did you even find out that these people existed?
Speaker 3:
11:24
Right. Well I was gonna say I actually attribute much if not all of my success really to finding mentors and a like minded community. That for me was absolutely huge. It has led me to, you know, being able to overcome imposter syndrome. It has led me to paid work. It has led me to extend my business. But I guess how I found it going back all the way to the beginning, you know, in my search like God I want to be a nurse but I can't work bedside, what do I do? And I started very simply with a Google search and it actually took me multiple tries to come up with something. But it was like nonclinical nursing jobs, non bedside nursing jobs. And like we said, all of these things came back management, this, that. And then finally I stumbled across this kind of smaller webpage.
Speaker 3:
12:17
It was from a wonderful nurse, Elizabeth Haynes, and she as well, uh, was I successful freelance writer. I just reached out to her with a very targeted specific questions. Not, hey, I want to do what you do. How do I do it? Because that's kind of hard to answer, right? But she was just so willing to help a novice writer, you know, providing me with a, a template. If I asked, providing me with a lead, you know, this is where maybe you should connect with some people. This is maybe where you should start writing. Here's how to start your portfolio. Things like that. It was really, to my surprise, how much she was willing to help because it's unfortunate, but that wasn't my experience throughout a lot of years in nursing. Uh, when it came to mentorship.
Speaker 2:
13:06
So bullies, the nurse bullies [inaudible] Thompson because she's gonna well, and that nurses eat their young, it's a, it's a name, it's a slogan that it goes across the u s I mean, it's horrible. The most trusted profession is the cruelest to each other. And Yeah, you know, who knows, who knows why. But I found that very, like, I almost, and this maybe something you struggle with too, like didn't believe it. Like you're almost like, is she really being nice to me? Because you don't, and even, let's be honest, the general community, you don't see that. And it's a heart of a human that we don't see anymore. And it's really sad, but it's even, I see it from, you know, people that I've mentored and coached through their writing journeys, like they're waiting for me to, to do some, they are not giving the right advice or make them buy something or whatever. And it's, people are really genuine and kind and helpful because we always say rising tides lift all boats and yeah. Yeah.
Speaker 3:
14:15
And I'll tell you what's really a trip now is getting emails from novice writers to me now I'm like, oh my gosh, like this is so, but you know, I, I really like to, um, just kind of pay it forward. And then of course, there's another wonderful mentor, which we cannot forget to mention. I have to bring up Carol Bush because she was absolutely inherited in my journey. And also, um, Mary Watson, she is the content manager, I believe is her title for all nurses.com. And really that was how I got my start. Um, my first article, I just, like I said, you know, I did a lot of research for where I could start writing with zero experience and I had a little folder on my laptop. I had tried to see if I could even write anything. The last time I had really written was I did like a little abstract piece for, uh, the oncology nursing society in my early twenties. Before that, it was probably like a paper in college, you know? Right. So I clicked on their little Lincoln at said, you know, we're looking for writers. I submitted a piece and I had submitted to two other, uh, website outlets as well. Weeks go by, I'm talking like almost two months, right? And I'm thinking, okay, well this solidifies it. You know, I'm just going to be on disability forever. I'm a crappy writer. We shouldn't get this. Is it,
Speaker 2:
15:37
you know, yourself, you're like, Yep, I stink. No one likes me. Everybody hates me. Yes. And go live in my head.
Speaker 3:
15:46
And to my surprise, I actually remember, this is very funny, uh, because those who know me, I'm like not an overly or certainly outwardly emotional person. Um, but I remember when Mary called me and she was just so thrilled with the piece. I think my first piece was something called the nurse's sacrifice. And it was talking basically about, you know, all the personal sacrifices that we do make as nurses working holidays, missing out on our children's events, our spouses birthdays, blah, blah, whatever it may be. And, um, I was really, I remember feeling really proud of it and then immediately like, you know, questioning it, right? Like I'll just probably sucks. And, uh, Mary and I had set up time to meet and I just remember being so overcome with emotion because not only did she validate that I was a good writer, but to my surprise, she said, you know, not only did we love this piece so much and want to publish it, but we want to bring you on as a contracted writer.
Speaker 3:
16:40
And yeah, at the time means money. Right. Right. And so, and this is what so funny because it brought me to tears, literally. I remember crying on the phone in my apartment at the time, you know, I had like just moved out to California maybe a year before and it just felt like such a big deal and it was, you know, but now looking back, it's so funny because like my very first article I got paid nothing. And then my second article, I think I maybe got $50 and now it's just, it's gotten so big so fast. It's just really funny to look back
Speaker 2:
17:14
[inaudible] last time as a writer than a nurse, like in a 12 hour writing shift. Are you making more than a nurse?
Speaker 3:
17:22
Well, yes. I mean there's no question.
Speaker 2:
17:26
Um, when you were a nurse, did you think that you could make that as a writer?
Speaker 3:
17:31
Never, never. No. Nine years here. Yeah. I really feel like I beat my own expectations because even the thought of like potentially even coming close, first of all, even just being able to make like, you know, 40 $50,000 and just not having to show up somewhere where I was like sick as a dog, I been happy more than happy with that at the time. Like that didn't even seem like an achievable goal to be able to make $50,000 as a writer and now like, yeah, to think you know, how far it's come and it's just really wild.
Speaker 2:
18:02
Um, that, that, you know, you started because you had the interest in and unfortunately an illness that led you to it, but even the drive led you to it. What kept you going after not hearing from places or all nurses? Just being the only client and you're making 50 bucks or whatever it was an article. Like you can't just write $50 articles and make six figures. How did you keep going? How did you take that next step? Or what was the next step I should ask?
Speaker 3:
18:33
Well one, I guess I kind of felt like I had to write because I thought, okay, if I'm going to come off disability, like I gotta make this work. You know? I really, I mean first I had to just take time to get myself well and rest and then, you know, once coming off disability was an option. It was certainly easier to do that when you're at home on a laptop, you know, then running on the floor. But really I think what kind of kept me going and kept me searching for new opportunities is similar to the reason why I really enjoy writing, like journalistic style pieces. It's the hunt. It's like the excitement of not knowing something and trying to master it. I liked figuring new things out, you know? I like the uncomfortableness of not being good at something in the beginning and then looking back a month later and being like, wow, I really had no clue. And now look at how good I am at it.
Speaker 2:
19:29
Yeah. I think also learning.
Speaker 3:
19:30
Yeah, I think like one example of that in more recent months for me. So there was a piece that mentioned my business and my personal story in the magazine, um, oncology nursing news written by a wonderful writer, Maureen Banana. And to my surprise, because of that piece running, I got a lot of really great work opportunities through that and I continue to get it through that one piece. You know, I'm where you get those leads from. Yeah. But one of them was for the American Cancer Society, which as an oncology nurse, I mean that was like Wyatt, right? Yes. And they're asking me like they're coming to me. They wrote me an email asking for me to work for them. I know you and I had spoken about this privately, but it was really bizarre because you know, they wanted me to work full time as a writer and I really had to grapple with, do I want to give up this business and work full time for someone else that I really want to work for.
Speaker 3:
20:38
Ultimately I decided to take a chance and write them back and say, you know, I really want to continue to work for myself, however, I do offer a freelance related to writing, blah, blah, blah. And then I somehow fell into being a freelance medical editor for them. And at the time I thought, oh, okay, well I'm a, I'm a writer. I mean I'm, I'm good at editing, but like do I even know medical editing really is. And then, you know, again, through mentorship and working, you know, with wonderful people throughout the organization and checking in with my mentors that I've gotten, you know, personally, it just kind of all fell together and now I feel like I can confidently say like, I'm pretty good at it.
Speaker 2:
21:20
Nice. Nice. Have they liked everything that you brought back to him?
Speaker 3:
21:24
Yes, but I will tell you it's the same every time. It's the same as when you write a piece, you know, you, you're really confident in it and you submit it. And then the second you hit send, you're, you have the stress sweats because you're like, oh my God. And they're, they're paying for it. Right. So you're like, what if they open this up? And they're like, what is this girl doing? She's telling capable. And that is a legitimate fear of mine that I've gotten better at managing that imposter syndrome is real
Speaker 2:
21:54
for real. It's so real. Oh, that is an awesome journey. And I want to share with our listeners how we also kept you going. We as in tell them about the group we created.
Speaker 3:
22:07
Yes. So the healthcare marketing network was in its infancy, I think when, you know, I kind of got in with everyone that was a part of it. Like I said, you know, I had reached out to Carol Bush, which Janine, you'll have to remind me of her exact title for the healthcare marketing network now co founder. That's what I, so her and I had had connected, you know, well, kind of before that. And um, so she was kind of the one who ended up bringing me in and you know, thanks to that, I've met so many, so many great people. But yeah, we even, I was asked to join a mastermind group before it, which was really just a handful of us that we're trying to motivate each other and figure out kind of each other's problems because really five years, you know, we're better than one and a five eyes on a document. We're better than one. So, or a website, you know, it was different than anything else I had ever been a part of. I remember Janine, when I got the invitation, and this again speaks to imposter syndrome, and I looked at the people on the, I guess roster of sorts and I thought, oh my God, why are they even inviting me on this? Because I'm going to be like, you know, I'm so green, I have nothing to offer. And now
Speaker 2:
23:26
if we didn't even have any ones for like Ashley,
Speaker 3:
23:31
truly. Yeah, right. I think that in itself was another learning experience for me too because I was so sure that I had nothing of value to bring to that group. And I think if you asked anyone that a part of it, they would say that that was 100% not true. Right. So you know, it's, everyone has something of value to bring to the table. No matter like how big or small your businesses, no matter how big or small your ideas are, you know, everyone really has something to say. And always like bringing a multitude of perspectives together is always the best way to approach and tackle kind of any options.
Speaker 2:
24:13
I think the accountability that we had to be there weekly was something November might be like personal win and a business when and we're like, oh, got to find one
Speaker 3:
24:27
if you know, if for me too, it really helped me come back a lot of kind of lonely.
Speaker 2:
24:33
That's good. I think a lot of us deal with essential personality tests. We shared books and summaries of books that we liked and yeah, it was definitely, it was a lot of fun when we still call me every once in a while, but we were really, meeting was a weekly by weekly and then, um, we did like hot seats and all that stuff and it was fun. Like it was, we really got close and the biggest thing like lucrative lies, everybody grew and everybody grew immensely from zero to full time or zero to six figures, however you want to look at it, which is, I mean, amazing. Absolutely amazing.
Speaker 3:
25:12
And you know, for the accountability, I think too that there really is something to be said about exactly what we did. You know, setting your intention and setting your goals on paper. Yeah. You know, like whatever on the laptop. Um, you know, on the Google doc, I was going to just let you know, I'm old school, I do everything on paper. I thought, yeah, there really is. Like I really attribute, again a lot of my growth to that too because if you don't take the time to sit down and think about where you want to go, then it's really hard to get there. You know? It's like kind of trying to find this elusive place without a roadmap really.
Speaker 2:
25:51
You don't even know yourself. No one around you that's ever done it and it is always nice to just bounce it off somebody else. And we all work together on a project for another client. Like we get referrals through each other and all that too, which was really cool. So where do you think you're going to go next? What are your plans into your school?
Speaker 3:
26:14
Well, one of the things I have learned to get better at recently is to say no to work, which sounds crazy. I know anyone that's listening right now. I was like, oh
Speaker 2:
26:27
yeah, she really says No. She is saying no. Right. It
Speaker 3:
26:32
sounds crazy because everyone will hit this point and it's, it doesn't matter how big your business gets, it has to do with, you know, work life balance and balancing multiple and things like that. And then, you know, just because somebody comes to you and wants a piece written, if it doesn't, if you're not going to enjoy it to an extent, if it's gonna like really cause you this amount of undue stress or it's something that you really hate doing where it's not a, it's not a client that you feel would help expand your portfolio. You don't have to take it, you know, you can look and kind of find things within your individual niche. And I feel like because I have kind of stuck to my guns in that I have had growth in the direction that I want. Surely enjoyed your work. Yeah. And you know, there's, there's been a lot of different opportunities that I've considered, you know, things like I think at one point I had told you, you know, like public speaking maybe that, but truly I am a bit of an introvert and have like a three thing here how public speaking and I realized that's not going to make me happy.
Speaker 3:
27:37
Um, but like an example of something that I did really want to break into and sure enough, I have just recently gotten an opportunity for it, um, is covering conferences. So specifically nursing word medical conferences. I had someone reach out to me recently and we are in the works of finalizing a contract, but I love that idea of kind of adding that into my service list. Um, I used to love going to nursing conferences, you know, cause I'm, like I said, a pretty big education nerd. Yeah. You know, who doesn't love a good PowerPoint presentation. So now like the thought of being able to go to one of these, like with a press badge or whatever, it's just, it's very, it's very exciting to me. And the thought of, you know, maybe being able to travel a little bit here and there with my work, you know, just to kind of like spice things up.
Speaker 2:
28:30
Okay, sure. In the one one place, you know you're in your house and it's Kinda cool cause it's California, so I'm sure there's a lot around you. There are urea.
Speaker 3:
28:38
Oh that reminds me, um, if anyone is interested, the [inaudible] conference, I don't want to mess up the acronym, but it's like American medical writers association, don't hold me to that, but I think that's what it is for 2019 is actually coming to San Diego. So I'm trying to get a lot of you within the healthcare marketing network to come and join me because I'm not necessarily covering that conference yet. However, if anyone wants me, I'm available
Speaker 2:
29:08
and I'm local.
Speaker 3:
29:10
But I would really love to connect with anyone and everyone that decides to come. That's part of the healthcare marketing network.
Speaker 2:
29:18
Did you say American Medical Writers Association? Maybe? Yes, it is. Definitely what I said then. Yes. Yeah. And actually I think we were, we were all thinking about making a little trip down there and making it a, you know, I'm coming from Ohio and Maureen's in PA and Alyssa's in Ohio. A lot of us are coming from the coast there that we would have to make it a couple day event and what a better way than hanging out with all of you guys would be so much fun.
Speaker 3:
29:50
I'm looking forward to all of us meeting in person because I know we've said this before, but it's very strange to me. I feel like I really know some of you girls so well and I would definitely consider us all friends. Yeah. But it's very funny to me that we've never actually met in real life. Although you know, when you zoom and Skype and all that once a week for x amount of weeks, I guess that's how it's going to be.
Speaker 2:
30:14
Yeah, well even when I met Carol the first time and Janet, it wasn't until this past, you know, end of the year, this past year and we, it was so weird. I'm like, Oh, you're like only a little bit taller than me. And they're like, shouldn't you are really little? Like it's so weird. But then it was like the same, cause we zoom all the time. So we see each other all the time. We hear each other all the time. We talk on the phone all the time. But if anybody is interested in it, is Wednesday, November six 2019 in San Diego for that conference. So if you want to throw it on your calendar now, we'd be more than happy to meet everybody down there.
Speaker 3:
30:53
Well now we'll have to make sure for the website that you and I take a photo together because I'm five 10 so I anticipated they were going to look like mutton. Jeff, you know,
Speaker 2:
31:03
goes. She's like, I think smaller than me, Carol. So I'm only, for our listeners, I'm only like four, 10, four 11 like maybe a hundred pounds. Maybe it's going to be a great photo. It's gonna be great. Stay tuned into that. So where can people find you? What's your website?
Speaker 3:
31:22
Yeah. Um, so my website is [inaudible] writing. That's a h a y, writing.com. Uh, and then my handle for pretty much everything. Uh, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram is a writing.
Speaker 2:
31:35
All right, cool. Well Ashley, it's been a pleasure as always. Thanks. Thanks so much for having me. And if you guys want to reach out to Ashley, she's always available, but you know, come on over to the Facebook group and do everything she says you'll do the same thing she's done right. Personally,
Speaker 3:
31:53
the goal and you know, we're all here to help.
Speaker 2:
31:56
Absolutely. Well, thanks so much Ashley, for taking time out in your day and thank you guys for listening today. What can we say, but go get your right on.
Speaker 1:
32:06
That's a wrap for today's episode of the savvy scribe. Thank you so much for listening. If you enjoyed today's show, we'd love for you to subscribe and leave a review on iTunes or your favorite podcast. And until next time.
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